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how to build your wardrobe

We have all experienced either “I don’t have enough clothing”, or ” I have so much clothing, but I have nothing to wear.” Most of us fall into the trap of having so many clothes and yet have nothing to wear. We live in this time of consumerism. Consumerism is when we consume more goods and services than we need and is large quantities. The earliest examples of consumerism can be followed back to the first human civilizations. Consumerism can be first seen during the Industrial Revolution and the transformation of Western Europe’s and North America’s economies, which also increased the population

.Industrialization created the circumstances for mass production and mass consumption; thus, for the first time in history, there was an enormous quantity of manufactured goods available to everyone at meager prices.The U.S. Government began a colossal campaign during the Second World War compelling citizens to be patriotic and to save resources, reuse and recycle, grow their food, and to share during the Second World War because of its demands leads to the scarcity of resources. Frugality became the new norm, but, in the 1950s, there were limited factories and labor to produce planes, weapons, and ships during the war.

The U.S. Government began a colossal campaign during the Second World War compelling citizens to be patriotic and to save resources, reuse and recycle, grow their food, and to share during the Second World War because of its demands leads to the scarcity of resources. Frugality became the new norm, but, in the 1950s, there were limited factories and labor to produce planes, weapons, and ships during the war and thus consumerism began again, and this problem predominates today in the United States (and Canada). We want more than we need.

Building your dream wardrobe isn’t complicated at all. If you understand your style and take the time to purchase the basics you need, getting dressed will always be enjoyable. My one simple, easy method of building your wardrobe is by using a pie chart. “A pie chart is a circular graph that shows the pertinent contribution that different categories contribute to an overall total.” The wedge of the circle depicts each category’s contribution, and every 1% contribution that a group contributes to the total corresponds to a slice with an angle of 3.6 degrees. I will call this pie chart a wardrobe pie.

A wardrobe pie, like my example below, has different categories that represent a section of your closet. The professional section consists of clothing that you’ll wear for the office, for church or general professional events. The casual part consists of items that you wear to casual circumstances such as jeans and tee shirts. Gym section is items you wear to the gym. The formal section includes of gowns that you’d wear to formal events. Loungewear consists of things you wear at home such as joggers, leggings, tank tops. A night out section includes of clothing you’d wear on dates and clubs/lounges. Misc/Useless consists of items in your closet that you don’t use and are hoarding.

General Wardrobe pie

What is wrong with this wardrobe pie for a person who works at an office and enjoys to go out quite frequently?

Wardrobe Pie problems

The primary problem that I see with this wardrobe pie is the 11.8% of Misc/useless Items; these usually include items such as old Halloween costumes, clothing with holes in them, clothing that doesn’t fit either too big or too small, old bridesmaid or wedding gowns that may never be worn again. Here it is best to limit these items from 0-5%. Let’s look at a new chart below.

Professional Wardrobe Pie
Professional Wardrobe Pie

Let’s explore each category separately. As a professional in the office, this client’s closet will likely consist primarily of professional clothing (38.5%). The fantastic thing about dressing in a professional setting is that the clothes can also be used for the church as well. Next, we have a night out section at 25.6% as this client loves to go out at night. If you have an activity that you partake in immensely, you want to have enough pieces so that you don’t fall into the “I have nothing to wear” Trap. Next, we have casual pieces at 12.8 %; it is also essential to have casual pieces such as jeans in your closet as you’ll probably wear them as often.

We have formal, gym and loungewear at 6.4%. Unless you work at a gym or sings at weddings or a formal gathering, you don’t need to fill your closet with ample of those items as they will only take up space. Similarly, you do not need so many loungewear items; this is usually where people waste most of their monies. On that note, you also don’t need so many lingeries and undergarments. Invest in good quality loungewear and undergarments, and you will not have so many. Finally, we have misc/useless items at 3.8%, which is fair enough. There may be some old costumes or gowns that you can’t yet part with that will go into this category.

Below is an example of a wardrobe pie for an athlete.

Athlete Professional Wardrobe Pie

Below is an example of a wardrobe pit for someone who works in a casual environment or primarily goes to school

Casual Wardrobe Pie

Below is an example of a wardrobe pie for someone who works at a nightclub.

Nightclub Wardrobe Pie

Next, let’s discuss accessories. Here is another area where we tend to spend way too much money and barely use them. Below is an example of an accessories pie consisting of handbags/wallets, jewelry, pumps, heeled sandals, scarves/hats/belts, flat sandals, flats, misc/useless/boot and sneakers. In the following example, the problem here again is the high percentage of misc/unnecessary items; here it could be old shoes, torn up shoes, accessories that are too small, outdated accessories, etc. Here we want to apply the same concept for the wardrobe and keep the misc/useless accessories to 1-5% as they take up so much unnecessary space.

Wardrobe accessories pie

Let’s analyze a wardrobe pie for a client who works at an office and enjoys to go out quite frequently and loves to wear pumps more than flats.

Accessories wardrobe pie professional

In the above example, the professional-client will spend most of her monies on heels because that is what she enjoys wearing and will probably own 1-2 pair of sneakers. Jewelry should be minimal as well, a few well-made pieces. The same applies to hats, scarves, and accessories. It is easy to stack up on unnecessary accessories, so spend a reasonable amount of time here.

The key to building your wardrobe by using a pie chart is to create a wardrobe pie with pieces that you like to wear and make you feel good. The wardrobe pie will help you have more control and direction of your wardrobe and how to shop for your wardrobe wisely. For example, if you mostly wear heels, you don’t need more than 1-2 sneakers and vice versa. This is my easy and simple method of building a wardrobe.

Contact me for a personalized pie of your current wardrobe in comparison to your dream wardrobe to help you build your wardrobe today.

cheryc

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